It all depends how we’re looking at it


dolphins and meditationSo I have recently moved from Florida (80 degrees, wall to wall sunshine, sea breezes, pelicans and dolphins) to Liverpool (frozen lake, not quite wall to wall sunshine, bracing wind, swans and Lambananas.)

Just now I was scooting down the stairs to the World Peace Café that is conveniently placed inside the large house I’m living in, meaning I don’t have to go outside, ever, if I don’t want to. At 3.48pm, it is already getting dark out there, and I was wondering whether to feel sorry for myself when I ran into J on the stairs.

“How are you doing, J?” “Great, thanks.” “What about this getting dark at 3.30, then?” “Oh, I love it! I love the winter.” “You do?!” “Yes, I love it. I love the spring and the summer too.” “Hmmm. I daresay you love the Fall, erm Autumn, as well?” “Oh yes, I love it! I love all four seasons.” Just as I was pondering mentally how anyone could love winter with such enthusiasm, and perhaps he had nothing to compare it with, he added, “I lived in Fort Lauderdale and Miami for three years when I was younger, and it was lovely, but I really missed the seasons!” lambananas in liverpool and kadampa life

“Well”, I told him, “That really shows how everything depends on the mind! And now I’m going to love the four seasons too.” So, dear reader, if you catch me complaining, please remind me of this conversation. As a friend told me the other day, there is no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong clothes. (It reminded us of Shantideva’s famous analogy about leather on the feet.)

In the last article on delusions, I talked about the object of delusion. While our delusions are still rampant, there is not an awful lot we can do about objects of delusion. Geshe Kelsang sums this up:

Even if we were to live in an isolated cave there would be some parts of the cave that would appear more attractive than other parts, and some kinds of weather that would seem more pleasant than others. We would soon find ourselves preferring this sort of birdsong to that sort of birdsong, and we would still have all the memories of other objects of delusion. ~ Understanding the Mind

It sounds like a pretty nice idea to me: “I’m going to get away from it all, get away from all these trying people and/or objects of temptation that surround me wherever I go. I’ll go to the countryside on retreat, or on top of a mountain in Brazil or Switzerland, or perhaps even a cave in the Himalayas. Hey, that’s awesome, that’s the answer!” meditating in a cave retreat season in NKT

Actually, it can be very helpful to go away sometimes from our usual environment and work on our minds, for example in meditation retreat. January is retreat month in the New Kadampa Tradition and it provides a refreshing and significant start to the year. However, by itself, getting away from it all is not going to solve the problem because, as they say, wherever we go, there we are. Our deluded mind comes along for the ride.

Cause of delusion # 3, inappropriate attention

As mentioned in this first article on the delusions, there are six causes of our delusions. These are like a chain that bind us to suffering and problems. To break a chain, especially one as strong as this, it makes sense to find its weakest link.

We just saw how the object is not the weakest link – it is hard to isolate ourselves from all objects of delusion because they are going to pop up wherever we take our deluded minds. We can run, but we cannot hide. Sooo, what to do?

Now we come to the weakest link in the chain that binds us to suffering, insofar as it is the easiest one for us to break at the moment. This is very lucky for us. We can work on all six causes of our problems to a certain extent, of course, but this is the one where we can really get in there and stop the course of the delusion.

I keep saying a delusion is an unpeaceful, uncontrolled mind, and this is true, but strictly speaking the actual definition of a delusion is “An unpeaceful, uncontrolled mind that arises from inappropriate attention.” Even if our mind meets an object of anger, say, we will only get angry if we let inappropriate attention develop. delusions distort

Inappropriate attention is that function of honing in on a jelly donut, for example, and exaggerating its power to make our day, or honing in on someone who annoys us and letting our peace be destroyed ostensibly by that person but actually by our inappropriate attention toward that person.

There are many levels of inappropriate attention, from very subtle to very gross. At the moment, whenever we see an object we naturally apprehend it as being inherently existent, as independent of the mind, nothing to do with us. This itself is an exaggeration and the most subtle form of inappropriate attention. It is also our ignorance of self-grasping.

attachment to jelly donutBecause we are grasping at things as if they were outside the mind, we then believe that their apparent desireability or distastefulness inhere in them, and have nothing to do with the way we are perceiving them. If something out there looks nice, we naturally want to pull it toward us, and attachment is born. If something out there looks nasty, we naturally want to push it away from us, and anger or aversion is born. Due to our initial exaggeration of the object’s ontological status as being inherently existent as opposed to a mere projection of our mind, like a dream object, we then engage in even more exaggeration: “That donut out there on the cake dish is really nice (ie, from its own side) – just look at that red jelly oozing out of it, and the sugar sprinklings, and think how well it will go with the Cappuchino from the World Peace Café downstairs?!” This is gross inappropriate attention, leading to attachment.

We can overcome subtle inappropriate attention with wisdom, and we can overcome gross inappropriate attention with mindfulness, alertness, and conscientiousness, applying the opponents to delusions as described here.

More on this subject later … over to you for now🙂

Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    Great reading, thanks for putting the defintions in also, very helpful, thankyou x

  2. Charlotte says:

    This morning I meditated on emptiness trying to familiarize myself with produced and unproduced space. I made requests for opportunities to recognize the teachings on emptiness during my day. This post was in my inbox and I recognize that it is an answer to my prayer. Thank you for the discussion and clarity. Very helpful.

  3. joyjean40 says:

    Yup definately keep up the good work of bringing your wisdom from the dharma out. I do not have much opportunity to meet with Sangha so have found great sustance in this. May you be blessed.. 🙂

  4. Great article Luna, i thought i had forgotten the jelly donuts…..mmmm……i am sure i will dream on it….mmmm…. ; )

  5. Lambananas? Eh?

  6. Aww Luna, you’re back!🙂 Florida’s loss is Miami’s gain. And don’t worry, the ice and snow will soon be replaced by England’s relentless drizzle again. Don’t tell me you didn’t miss that ;~) I’ll maybe get to meet you one day now too.
    * Another example of things depending on the mind. Both my fur-babies are dozing on the sofa. Whenever I drop something in the kitchen, the nervous fluffball flees in terror of a perceived threat; while the opportunist doggie races in on the off-chance it was food. Both have had different puppy-hood experiences, and both have fixed ideas as to what the crashing sound means.

    • * Florida’s loss is Liverpool’s gain, that is. And it always strikes me how human the dog’s reaction to things can be.

      • Actually, I don’t think Miami will miss me much — I lived on the opposite coast so they won’t even notice i’ve gone😉 That is a great example of the two dogs’ reaction to the “same” event.

        • It was a typo!! But anyway, I hope you’ve settled into Liverpool and are getting back into the swing of our weather. Good luck with it all.

  7. We’re very lucky to have you in the U.K. Thanks for coming 😃

  8. Venerable Lady says:

    Without Spiritual Guides and teachers, we’d be forever stuck in the gloop of samsara, being tortured and tormented by the sticky donut of attachment!

    Love the articles, thanks.xx

  9. Maureen says:

    Love all your newsletters. Keep up the good work.

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